Moodle Course Half Complete!

So, here I am halfway through with creating this online course which will be used to blend and flip a high school classroom.  Moodle still surprises me with its relative ease of use – editing is a cinch, they have this duplication feature which lets you easily duplicate a piece that will look relatively similar in another area of the course…  it’s very user friendly.  I really haven’t had to change any part of my design due to limitations of the LMS.  But I’m pretty sure I’ve already talked about that.

Now that I have half of the course developed, and one peer review down, there are a number of slight revisions I’ve made and there are still a few things I need to learn and adjust.  My peer review came from my classmate Jason, who gave me a number of good things to look at.  The main one I’ve implemented so far is changing each week’s headings to be more prominent so that each section is more distinct on the main page of the course.  It looks so much better.  He reminded me to make sure that any PDFs I want turned in should have form regions that allow students to complete them without scanning them in (which I believe I’ve done).  Jason also pointed out that I need to clarify expectations of the wikis, as well as the overall format of the course, which I intend to do within the next two weeks.  He also wondered if there’s a way to make one glossary and just link each section to it without having independent glossaries.  I’m going to have to look into that, though my gut feeling is that I will keep them as independent glossaries if only for the reason that it will make it easier for the teacher to grade each week’s additions.  Maybe there’s a way to then combine them all at the end?  I don’t know.  I’ll look into it.

I still haven’t taken the time to figure out the grade system yet.  I think when I get toward the end of the development, I will then look over all the grading ins and outs and then edit everything I’ve done to make sure it is all cohesive.  I also looked at some of my peers’ courses and found a few elements I liked – like limiting quiz retakes, only allowing access to the next assignments once the previous one is complete, etc. – which I would like to go back and implement.  I will also look into downloading this into a system that works with whatever our school has access to so that my teacher who wants to utilize this course will have access to it.

I’m told that in the professional world, there is an average of a three week turn around on projects like this… to which I say, sign me up!  It is certainly time consuming to do, but the fact that I’m working full time and able to do this plus another course… and still manage to do a few social things and hobbies too… means I think I’m cut out for a job in instructional design should I choose to go into a field like this.  It requires creativity and an eye for detail, and I really enjoy that kind of stuff.  It’s exciting to learn of new career opportunities that will be available to me after I finish this degree.  So close!  Can’t wait!

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Job Aid for QR Codes in the Classroom

QR Codes in the Classroom

 

Introduction

Many teachers would like to incorporate more technology into the classroom but are deterred due to many factors:  they do not feel comfortable with the technology themselves, they do not have time to fully develop good lessons involving technology, they are hesitant to rely on technology for their lesson in case something goes wrong with the technology (rendering their lesson useless), or they simply do not know what sort of technology is available and how to use it in their classroom.  QR codes are a relatively simple, versatile way to incorporate some technology into a class.  In this three hour, face to face interactive professional development workshop, participants will become familiar with QR codes and their many uses, and will develop a ready-to-go lesson that they will commit to using in the following school year.


Starting the Workshop

In preparation for the class, a few things will need to be done well in advance.

Three Weeks Before
Double check that the PowerPoint is edited the way you want it.  Make sure the room you are scheduled to be in has access to the necessary technology, and that you will have the technology you need reserved in your name for that day.  Specifically, you will want to have a laptop cart, iPad cart, document camera, a laptop for your personal use, a wireless mouse, and extra outlets/extension cords for the day of the workshop.  If you do not personally own a Smartphone, try to arrange to borrow one for the purpose of this workshop.

One Week Before

In the week before your workshop, make sure that the QR codes work, that the links you have linked from your PowerPoint still work, and make any copies you will need for the workshop. 

Day of Workshop, before it begins:

Technology
Be sure that the internet is up and running, and that you are able to connect to your device(s).  Have your projector ready to go, connected with your laptop which should be displaying the corresponding QR Codes in the Classroom PowerPoint.  You may also want to have your QR code websites loaded so that you can easily switch to them without wasting any time.

Classroom Materials
Make sure you also have classroom materials, such as the practice QR codes for scanning, copied and ready to go.  You could even place them on the participants’ desk or table to save time.

Checklists and Surveys
Also make sure that you have your checklists that you will use to assess the success of your participants ready to go.  You should also have plenty of copies of the post-workshop evaluation printed.


Timeline

The session should take approximately three hours.  A timeline of how the session should go is as follows (demonstrated in minutes/hours):

0:00-5:00               Introductions – Tell learners about yourself and your experience in education and technology.  Have learners introduce themselves also.  (Slide 1 of ppt)

5:00-15:00             Introduction to QR codes – Explain the definition of a QR code and examples of their uses.  (Slide 2-7 of ppt)

15:00-30:00           Discuss various QR code scanner applications, then assist learners in gaining access to the store for their device, downloading a scanner app, and using that app.  (Slide 8 and 9 of ppt)

30:00-50:00           Discuss the types of QR codes (URL, Phone Number, Text, SMS, Business Contact), and have them scan different QR codes to see how each type works on their device.  Go to the website www.qrcode.kaywa.com to demonstrate and practice.

50:00-1:10:00        Introduce different websites that can be used to create QR codes, and demonstrate how to create QR codes and use them in word documents.  (You will use the same website from the previous step, but also use slide 10-13 of ppt)

1:10:00-1:30:00     Demonstrate how to copy and paste a QR code into a word document (right click on the QR code image, click “copy image,” open a new word document, then right click and press “paste”).  Learners will practice by creating a URL QR code, a text QR code, and a Business Contact QR code, and then successfully place each code with a label on a word document. 

1:30:00-1:50:00     Discuss more ways people have used QR codes in the classroom – instructor will show examples, and learners will brainstorm and list general ways they could use QR codes in their own lessons, and then they will generate a short list of specific lessons that QR codes can be incorporated into.  (Slide 15)

1:50:00-2:00:00     Short Break

2:00:00-2:10:00     Instructor will tell learners the instructions for the last piece of the session – that they will create a ready-to-implement lesson (or part of a lesson, like an opener or closure) to be used in the following school year.  They will have about 35 minutes to create the lesson (ideally modifying an existing lesson to include QR codes, but they can create one from scratch if they prefer).  They can work with like-subject and/or like-grade level teachers or individually.  The instructor will be walking around to help and answer questions. (Slide 16 of ppt)

2:10:00-2:45:00     Learners will work on their lessons

2:45:00-2:55:00     Learners will present their lessons and discuss the benefits and drawbacks to incorporating technology like QR codes into their lessons.

2:55:00-3:00:00     Learners will complete an end-of-session survey covering how they think the training went, how helpful it was, how much they think they learned, and whether they would recommend it to another teacher.

Appendix A:  Checklist assessment

Checklist Assessment:

  • Learner can discuss what a QR code is.
  • Learner can discuss ways that QR codes can be used.
  • Learner can select, download and use their own scanner application.
  • Learner can determine which type of QR code would best suit individual scenario purposes.
  • Learner can create their own QR code.
  • Learner can adapt QR classroom example lessons to fit their subject or grade level.
  • Learner can develop their own QR classroom lesson.
  • Learner can assess the benefits and drawbacks of integrating technology (like QR codes) into the classroom.

Appendix B:  End of Workshop Evaluation

QR Codes in the Classroom: Evaluation

 

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

This workshop was well organized.

5

4

3

2

1

The presenter was knowledgeable about the material.

5

4

3

2

1

I understand what a QR code is.

5

4

3

2

1

I understand how to create a QR code.

5

4

3

2

1

I understand how to find and download apps that will let me scan QR codes.

5

4

3

2

1

I understand how to scan and use QR codes.

5

4

3

2

1

I understand the different types of QR codes and when to use them.

5

4

3

2

1

I am familiar with different ways I can use QR codes in the classroom.

5

4

3

2

1

I feel confident about incorporating QR codes into my curriculum next school year.

5

4

3

2

1

Overall, this workshop was very useful to me.

5

4

3

2

1

 

Please include any additional comments below:

 

My experience with Instructional Design thus far

Creating the design document for my “QR codes in the classroom” professional development has been a tedious process, reminding me of my undergrad days of lesson planning (the writing of them especially).  As an undergrad, we were required to prepare very detailed lesson plans for every lesson, which we were assured we would be doing as actual teachers in the classroom.  Then I became a teacher where I have not once in seven years had to create super detailed lesson plans for every lesson (or any lesson, really).  Some schools have required a basic outline of objectives, lesson activities, and assessment, but the details required in lesson planning or instructional design have yet to be required.  That being said, if teachers had the time and resources to put this much thought into every lesson, we would most likely have a lot more effective learning going on in the classroom.

Developing my design document has helped me to fully envision this professional development from beginning to end, and by considering all the previous learning from both this graduate program in instructional technology and other PD/classes/workshops along the way, I feel like the professional development we provide this summer will be informative, effective, interesting, and directly applicable to the learners that attend.  Thorough planning, as we are doing with our design document, will ensure a more successful outcome — and with proper planning, we also have built-in evaluation to see if it was as effective or successful as we would have liked.  This allows us to make necessary changes for subsequent delivery of the same material, allowing the design to get better and better with reflection.

Instructional Design Analysis: QR codes in the classroom

I’m currently developing an instructional design for a professional development workshop that teaches k-12 teachers the many ways QR codes can be incorporated into the classroom.  In the analysis process (the first step in our design process), I learned that a lot of people do not know what QR codes are (at least not by name — though many recognize them when they see them).  Even those who know what a QR code is often didn’t know how many different uses they can have — that you can use them to open a link, save text information, even download contact information into your phone!  The analysis process helped me compile a list of needs, and has given me an overall, organized focus of the training goals and objectives, which will help me in the development of my instructional design.  For this instructional design, the goals and objectives are as follows:

  1. The learner will become familiar with QR codes.  They will be able to:
    1. Define what a QR code is.
    2. Give examples of how QR codes are used.
    3. Choose, download, and effectively use an appropriate QR reader app for their smartphone or iPad.
    4. Distinguish between different types of QR codes (URL, Text, Phone Number, SMS, Business Contact) and when each is best used.
    5. Create their own QR codes.
  2. The learner will understand new ways to incorporate QR codes into the classroom.  They will be able to:
    1. Modify example QR code lessons and uses in a classroom to fit their needs.
    2. Design their own QR code lesson for the following year.
    3. Assess the drawbacks and benefits of integrating this type of technology into a classroom setting.

With this set of goals and specific objectives in mind, I imagine the first part of the training will be simple explanation and demonstration of QR codes, followed by some hands-on use and then creation of QR codes by attendees.  After people get familiar with QR codes (Goal #1), we will apply that new knowledge of this technology to how we can incorporate that into a classroom.  Examples of how other people have integrated QR codes will be provided, and attendees will brainstorm and modify how they can use similar techniques in their own classroom.  Once they have brainstormed a bit, they will have time to fully develop a ready-to-go lesson that they will commit to using in the upcoming school year.  As a closure, they will reflect on the benefits and drawbacks to this new technology (ex., integrating technology is a district-wide goal and can help engage students more, but sometimes can be very frustrating from a teacher’s point of view because of how often things go wrong with technology).  I’m excited to develop the rest of this instruction!